2017 Technologies Driving GRC Change

Scott Wisniewski, Managing Director GRC Tech Advisory Solutions

Digital transformation was probably one of 2016’s top buzzwords, meaning many different things to different analysts, journalists and vendors. For me, it represents real and significant investments in modernizing IT infrastructures, including those that support GRC activities and processes.

Consider the trends we’re immersed in. Enterprises are adopting cloud and mobile technologies at an extraordinary rate in the hopes of driving greater productivity and collaboration, and organizations of all sizes are launching data initiatives involving the collecting and analyzing of massive amounts of data in order to drive better business decisions and improve customer experience. At the same time, the rapidly evolving regulatory environment, such as the EU’s impending Global Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), is putting pressure on legal, compliance, security and IT departments to invest in a range of new data initiatives, consulting services and technologies.

In response to the trends, organizations are rethinking their GRC infrastructures, hoping to gain a much broader and deeper understanding of risk drivers and the bigger GRC picture. Further, to make GRC work effectively in increasingly complex and highly distributed organizations, GRC leaders recognize they must embed GRC into the everyday activities of the business.

The combined impact of all these activities will make 2017 the year that GRC practitioners will:

  • Acknowledge that effective GRC cannot be achieved via a single technology or application. Instead it will depend on a new, complete architecture. A single GRC application today may expose operational risk, but it cannot develop and present the type of complete GRC picture that regulators and boards are now demanding. Developing such a picture requires the combination of traditional GRC applications and new tools to:
    • Extract data from internal systems, such as information security and ERP
    • Consume external content, such as regulatory content feeds
    • Incorporate performance metrics, such as sales and financial results
    • Collect and consolidate market and credit risks as well as the risks identified by business intelligence tools and other analytics

With all these new tools in place, organizations will finally be able to build new presentation layers that provide a complete – and far more useful – picture of their GRC profile.

  • Take advantage of increased information sharing and collaboration to improve governance. As part of their digital transformations, many enterprises are focused on developing new and more effective ways to share information and collaborate. The ability to manage and track this activity will enable GRC programs to incorporate affirmative governance components, such as corporate culture and business achievements. It will also enable the embedding of GRC program elements, such as activities assigned to Line 1 business owners, into the enterprise applications they access every day, encouraging them to more consistently follow governance best practices as they engage in their daily activities.
  • Improve risk decision-making by using data analytics. Thanks to an array of new technologies – in-memory computing, visualization tools, mobile reporting services, etc. – organizations can now rapidly aggregate and analyze huge volumes of data from systems across the enterprise. Data scientists are also developing new methodologies and business rules to aggregate and optimize data for analytics more effectively. As a result, organizations will finally be able to automate many GRC tasks, such as risk scoring assessments, thereby automatically exposing potential risk hot spots that previously went undetected until the damage was done.

I have never been more optimistic about the evolution of GRC. As assurance professionals, lines of business and IT work together to implement new strategies and new supporting technologies, we will transform GRC from mere operational risk management to a function that can protect organizations while actually helping them to be more successful.

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