It’s Not the Time for Banks to Abandon Vendors

Ed Page - Protiviti Chicagoby Ed Page
Managing Director – Leader, Protiviti’s National Financial Services IT Consulting Practice

 

A recent article in American Banker Bank Technology News raises the prospect that stiffer vendor risk management requirements may push banks to bring more IT work in-house. Given the rigor being demanded these days, it’s hard to argue against that position, but banks and regulators alike need to be aware that this could have unintended consequences, particularly at midsize and smaller banks.

Large banks generally have the scale and skills to run IT services in-house, so insourcing to reduce the overhead of vendor management may be a viable approach. However, driving IT services in-house at smaller institutions may create a whole different set of risks. Many midsize and smaller institutions have long depended on outsourced relationships to provide essential IT services, both as a means of acquiring technical competencies and to reduce costs related to IT operations. Consequently, many lack the core competencies, experience and expertise needed to run things in-house.

I liken this a little to the do-it-yourself (DIY) phenomenon in home improvement. Although there are certainly a lot of DIY projects that people can undertake, a project such as upgrading the 1940s era knob and tube electrical wiring currently in your home to current standards is better left to the professionals (unless, of course, you are an electrical wiring expert!).

Insourcing may also pose a secondary risk for the industry as a whole. At a time when banks need to innovate to stay competitive, banks may be discouraged from working with vendors – particularly smaller vendors – who may be creating breakthroughs. This may lead to financial institutions missing opportunities to either drive down costs or introduce new products and services, which in turn creates risk from those institutions and non-bank competitors who are more willing to work with outside providers.

Technology and data are the life blood of banking, so the regulatory intent to ensure accountability and governance over these critical services is undeniably correct, but banks must guard against overreacting in ways that create other equal or even greater risks. The industry needs to retain both insourcing and outsourcing as viable alternatives. Ultimately, organizations should develop an IT strategy based on their business priorities and competencies. That strategy should be supported by a well-defined IT architecture, strong IT and data governance, and – where outsourcing is dictated – sound vendor management.

And for more insights into vendor risk management, I encourage you to read the benchmark report that the Shared Assessments Program and Protiviti recently released on the maturity of vendor risk management in organizations today.

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